Six Questions

Six Questions: Jerome Ming

Tique | art paper asks six questions to an artist about their work and inspiration.
This week: Jerome Ming.

Artist Jerome Ming
Lives in Tokyo, Japan
Website http://www.jeromeming.com/

How do you describe your own art practice?

Primarily informed by personal experience. Everything seems to work perfectly in my mind but I deviate when I put things into practice. It happens with a process based work ethic. It is also undefined for me, I try to avoid typical categorization.

Jerome Ming, Untitled, from the Photographic series 'Oobanken', Published by MACK.

Which question or theme is central in your work?

The temporary existence of things and the false sense of belonging.

Jerome Ming, Untitled, from the Photographic series 'Oobanken', Published by MACK.

What was your first experience with art?

Until recently I was living in South Africa and I was fortunate to observe my three year-old daughter discover the beginnings of her creative language from familiar surroundings. Growing up in southern Africa I acquired the foundations of what art can be.

Jerome Ming, Untitled, from the Photographic series 'Oobanken', Published by MACK.

What is your greatest source of inspiration?

At this point it’s probably my daughter for the work I am currently making.

Jerome Ming, Untitled, from the Photographic series 'Oobanken', Published by MACK.

What do you need in order to create your work?

A lifetime, and it helps if I have both hands and at least one good eye. In essence I don’t require much, I like to try to improvise with a given situation and with whatever material is at hand.

Jerome Ming, Untitled, from the Photographic series 'Oobanken', Published by MACK.

What work or artist has most recently surprised you?

Recently, I would say Giorgio Morandi. It’s an odd choice, but if I had been made aware of his work much earlier, maybe I would have tried to become a painter. I am fascinated by the hermitic approach he took to arrive at his paintings.

out now

Tique | publication on contemporary art #3: Six Questions