Six questions for
Daniele Di Girolamo

Tique asks six questions to an artist about their work and inspiration.
This week: Daniele Di Girolamo.

Artist Daniele Di Girolamo
Lives in Malmö, Sweden
Website https://danieledigirolamo.com/

How do you describe your own art practice?

In my installations I use ambiguous sounds and shapes, misunderstandings, symbolic combinations, literal interpretations, material rhymes and everything that can help me to show a changing and elusive world, in order to emphasize the difference between how we think things works and how they really are – and of which we will never know. Whenever possible I prefer to present environmental installations, in which the sound aspect of the materials is strongly involved.

Which question or theme is central in your work?

How things are revealed through relationships, and how this network of relationship (of which we are part) resonate in us and us in it, not only in physical presence but also in time: how a past experience continues to resonates in us, still shaping the present. I am always amazed by the growing complexity of this network of relationships, and by the consequent possibility of being able to change the register with which we read the world, reconnecting with it in ever new ways. This amazement is what I basically want to trigger with all my works.

What was your first experience with art?

I’m not sure. I remember spending countless hours watching one of my older brothers while he drew. I often stood next to him and my height barely reached the desk, allowing me to see him draw and color. I remember it was a magnetic and magical feeling.

What is your greatest source of inspiration?

I realized that often some strong past experience activates a source of energy that wants to materialize in a work. As if it became a need to transfer an internal atmosphere to an outside space, but not necessarily in a direct translation. Then when something resonates a lot with this internal atmosphere it captures all my attention and it can be a sentence from a friend, a book, a dry twig, a found material.

What do you need in order to create your work?

A lot of time and some space. Different works have different circumstances and require different needs, but surely a need that never changes is the time to let the things work and the space in which that can happen.

What work or artist has most recently surprised you?

The paintings of Bruno Zhang and Luisa Badino of the Zolforosso collective. I recently visited them and talked to them a lot. They have rekindled in me a strong fascination for painting, of which I know little. Perhaps for this reason it surprised me a lot.

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