Six questions for
Camille Benarab-Lopez

Tique asks six questions to an artist about their work and inspiration.
This week: Camille Benarab-Lopez.

Artist Camille Benarab-Lopez
Lives in Paris
Website http://www.camillebenarablopez.fr/

How do you describe your own art practice?

In my practice I explore our relationship to images, their temporality and flatness, in which a double impulse of desire and frustration is mixed. My work begins by gathering visuals from different sources and of different status, which in turn, through multiple techniques and mediums, result in a process of montage and composition, both pictorial and sculptural. Faced with the anxiety caused by the scattering and dissemination of images, I try to keep them together, to assemble them by correspondence, by association, by dissonance. I create works that are built around the archive as a possibility of a dialogue to be deciphered, and draw their forms from the latency retained in the multitude of existing images.

Which question or theme is central in your work?

How can you contain what is visible, time, and therefore also the overflow, and the lack? Obsessional gestures intended to dig and understand the effects that images provoke in me. How do I ensure that the works I create both investigate and watch over the visuals I use? “The image is no longer only synonymous with content, it becomes itself an object-container in which we deposit, enclose, shelter, and protect” (Atlele Soltani).

What was your first experience with art?

Very simple: when I was a child and took drawing lessons.

What is your greatest source of inspiration?

The images of others.
Sometimes a few sentences from books can also be a trigger.

What do you need in order to create your work?

Regularity, method, time, and podcasts.
And the frequent gathering of images, according to changing themes and desires.

What work or artist has most recently surprised you?

Anne Imhof at the Palais de Tokyo and the Faust album with Eliza Douglas, the novels of Joyce Carol Oates, the work of B. Ingrid Olson, which I have unfortunately only been able to see in photography to date.

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