Exhibitions

Petunia feat. Caroline Mesquita: Pink Everywhere

For her first solo show in a German institution French artist Caroline Mesquita transformed the Kunstverein Langenhagen into an immersive metal environment.

Exhibition Pink Everywhere
Artist(s) Caroline Mesquita
Venue Kunstverein Langenhagen
Photography Thomas Ganzenmüller Hannover, Courtesy of Kunstverein Langenhagen

Whereas in previous works Caroline Mesquita (b.1989) has used folded metal tubes that prevent viewers from entering it, this time the installation invites visitors to navigate the exhibition space along a metal construction of tubes and plates where brass human size sculptures are displayed and meet in front a video projection. In this video work titled “pink everywhere” –as the exhibition’s title-, the artist interacts with sculptures similar to the ones in the exhibition space, male and female, sometimes painted, sometimes oxidized, in a succession of scenes oscillating between tenderness, role play, sexual envy, astonishment, and violence.

If her earlier video works recalled the allegory of Pygmalion falling in love with his sculpture Galatea, it seems that this time in a reversal of roles, many Galateas are playing with the multiple identities an artist can have.

The exhibition by Caroline Mesquita originates in a proposal by Valerie Chartrain, co-founder and co-editor in chief of Petunia, a feminist art and entertainment journal, organised around subjective emergencies, non-exhaustively presenting multiple facets on a topic, and multiple forms from theoretical texts to diary entries, to pure fiction or comics by critics, curators and artists.

The extension of the invitation of Petunia und Caroline Mesquita pursues the ongoing cooperation with French artists and curators established by the Kunstverein Langenhagen during the last 8 years. Following the curatorial program 2016 this exhibition questions forms of collaborative practices in contemporary art.

Read more about Caroline Mesquita in Tique | art paper #1: Transition.

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Tique | art paper #2:
Contemporary Camera